Will Kalani get uniforms?

Sample+uniform+of+Bishop+Anstey+High+School.+Photo+by+Kathy+Smart-Preston.+Wiki+Commons.
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Will Kalani get uniforms?

Sample uniform of Bishop Anstey High School. Photo by Kathy Smart-Preston. Wiki Commons.

Sample uniform of Bishop Anstey High School. Photo by Kathy Smart-Preston. Wiki Commons.

Sample uniform of Bishop Anstey High School. Photo by Kathy Smart-Preston. Wiki Commons.

Sample uniform of Bishop Anstey High School. Photo by Kathy Smart-Preston. Wiki Commons.

Ka Leo Staff, Editorial

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Does the Kalani dress code need to be revisited? Forty teachers seem to believe it does. Some even go so far as to call for Kalani to require uniforms.

These teachers have petitioned Principal Otani for “stricter rules and enforcement of Kalani’s weak dress code.” They believe the current “weak dress code” causes behavioral issues and distracts students.

Kalani doesn’t need uniforms or a new dress code. The dress code is not a big deal, especially when there are other, bigger problems at play that cause actual distractions and behavioral issues. One such problem is cell phone use during class time.

Punishing girls because of what they wear instead of punishing the boys who can’t keep themselves in check promotes toxic behavior. It also teaches boys that they can do what they want without consequence. Teaching boys that the world will bend to their will, even at the expense of girls shows them that they are more important than women.

A school’s job is to educate its students, not tell them what to wear, not embarrass them or teach them their bodies are something to be ashamed of. Many teenagers are going through identity issues and telling them they should be ashamed of who they are doesn’t help.

For many students, clothing is a form of expression and to take that away or limit our self-expression makes us feel less in control of our lives than we already do and will lead to more behavioral issues.

With that said, if nearly half the teachers believe it’s a problem, it must be, right?

Maybe not.

The only people who actually seem distracted by what students are wearing are teachers.

Dress code is a scapegoat for the real issues of phones. Ask any student: more are distracted by their pocket computers than their peers’ clothing choices.

If you feel dress code needs to be changed, voice your opinion to the front office or your counselor. We feel: if students are comfortable in what they’re wearing, it’s none of your business. At this age, it should be a personal matter.

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