Kim Chee Restaurant No. 2 during COVID

From+Kim+Chee+2%27s+Instagram+page+on+Oct.+1%3A+%22This+is+what+that+lucky+family+is+getting+our+first+give+away+was+tear+jerking+and+so+humbling+but+I+need+your+guys+in+helping+sharing+and+reposting+so+more+people+hear+about+our+giveaway+kimchee2+loves+all+our+customers%2FFAMILY+one+love+fam.%22

From Kim Chee 2’s Instagram page on Oct. 1: “This is what that lucky family is getting our first give away was tear jerking and so humbling but I need your guys in helping sharing and reposting so more people hear about our giveaway kimchee2 loves all our customers/FAMILY one love fam.”

Lauren Vierra, Food Review

Restaurants are a topic of contention currently, with ever-changing COVID-era laws and restrictions. Many restaurant owners have found it tough to stay afloat. Since restaurants depend on and cater to a specific customer pool, some have done better than others, like Kimchee 2, the locals-oriented Korean restaurant on Kaimukiʻs Waialae Avenue. 

From Kim Chee 2’s Instagram page on Oct. 1: “This is what that lucky family is getting our first give away was tear jerking and so humbling but I need your guys in helping sharing and reposting so more people hear about our giveaway kimchee2 loves all our customers/FAMILY one love fam.”

Having a cohort of loyal customers, in addition to being family-owned and run, Kimchee 2 has been doing well despite these difficulties. 

“COVID is making everything just really tight,” Jimmy Chun said. “We try every day…we ainʻt gonna close. Weʻll get through COVID together.” 

Chun is the son of the chain owner and the manager of operations. 

Well-intentioned, they’ve taken up the mantle to help others and have been making meals for people who could use a helping hand. 

“Itʻs a casual thing,” he said. “Do a little here and there for the community. It helps that when people hear about it they help us help others.” 

Chun denied being an “angel” or some pious man. He laughed, winking through a jolly chuckle. 

“Trust me, Iʻm far from it,” Chun said, with an air of easy-going deviousness.  “The opposite, in fact, the devil… Itʻs nice to do good though.” 

He remarked about how the entire local community in Oʻahu has been put on a damper but was optimistic about it, saying it was a complicated situation and a “setback.”

“Do some good if you can,” he said. “Itʻs a thing you never regret.”